Difference between revisions of "Memory of Mankind"

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'''Memory of Mankind''' is a project funded in 2012 by Martin Kunze. The main goal is to preserve the knowledge about our present civilization from oblivion and collective amnesia. Information is printed on ceramic tablets, then stored in the salt mine of Hallstatt, Austria. More than a simple archive project, it aims to create the "Time capsule of our era", letting people participate by allowing them to submit texts and images. In contrast to national archives, content for MOM is collected by anyone who takes part. It is a collective, "bottom-up" told history.  
 
'''Memory of Mankind''' is a project funded in 2012 by Martin Kunze. The main goal is to preserve the knowledge about our present civilization from oblivion and collective amnesia. Information is printed on ceramic tablets, then stored in the salt mine of Hallstatt, Austria. More than a simple archive project, it aims to create the "Time capsule of our era", letting people participate by allowing them to submit texts and images. In contrast to national archives, content for MOM is collected by anyone who takes part. It is a collective, "bottom-up" told history.  
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== Archive ==
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* https://www.memory-of-mankind.com/ - {{job|3inj7}}
  
 
== See also ==
 
== See also ==

Latest revision as of 13:31, 26 July 2020

Memory of Mankind
Memory of Mankind logo
Memory of Mankind.jpg
URL https://www.memory-of-mankind.com/
Project status Online!
Archiving status Unknown
Project source Unknown
Project tracker Unknown
IRC channel #archiveteam (on EFnet)
Project lead Unknown

Memory of Mankind is a project funded in 2012 by Martin Kunze. The main goal is to preserve the knowledge about our present civilization from oblivion and collective amnesia. Information is printed on ceramic tablets, then stored in the salt mine of Hallstatt, Austria. More than a simple archive project, it aims to create the "Time capsule of our era", letting people participate by allowing them to submit texts and images. In contrast to national archives, content for MOM is collected by anyone who takes part. It is a collective, "bottom-up" told history.

Archive

See also

External links